Building a collaborative learning team

Building a collaborative learning team

Collaborative Learning (See the Tanner article)

Developmental stages of Augment Training activities, from beginner individuals to a production-capable programming team. Key concepts are presented as they are expected to emerge during training:

  1. For those looking to become programmers, expect a weekly time commitment of about 5 hours/week for 10 weeks.
  2. Trainees will work asynchronously, with team-building taking place over multi-person Skype sessions.

Augment™ Programmer Training Syllabus — Highlights

Stage 1- Team Formation — Explanation of goals

Stage 2- Familiarization with Mathematica, key examples

Stage 3- Learning powerful concepts of programming using compact Mathematica

Stage 4- Entry level tasks, guided by experienced programmer

Stage 5- Learning different language constructs one at a time, one person at a time

Stage 6- Jigsawing the team together, each person has a different skill

Stage 7- Production of complex programs by consolidating skills and teamwork

Stage 8- Bringing on additional new learner team members into a growing team

Stage 9- Deployment of skills in Production Teams

 

Augment™ Programmer Training Syllabus — Detail

Stage 1- Team Formation — Explanation of goals

  • Building a collaborative team — Working towards integrating different roles & skills
  • Dialing in asynchronous, distributed communication tools & protocols
  • Using a simulation to show cost / benefit of changes in programming skills

Stage 2- Familiarization with Mathematica, key examples

  • Operations, Syntax, Notation, Logic
  • Elements of programming in Mathematica
  • Writing simple programs

Stage 3- Learning powerful programming concepts using compact Mathematica

  • Basic and Advanced programming skills
  • Self-Assessment
  • Paths to expertise, improvement is everything

Stage 4- Entry level tasks, guided by experienced programmer

  • Introducing Requirements, Specifications, Coding
  • Debugging vs. Diagnosis and Repair
  • Knowing code works without testing

Stage 5- Learning different language constructs one at a time, one person at a time

  • Personalized learning paths
  • “Laying track” for others to follow in learning paths

Stage 6- Jigsawing the team together, each person has a different skill

  • Developing competency-based roles and responsibilities within team
  • Doing what you’re good at — and not what you’re not good at.

Stage 7- Production of complex programs by consolidating skills and teamwork

Stage 8- Bringing on additional new learner team members into a growing team

  • New members follow learning paths of more advanced members.

Stage 9- Deployment of skills in Production Teams

Notes:
Most of the Novice-Advanced Beginner skills in Mathematica can be learned without assistance. Requests/Questions can be posted to the shared Help page as needed.

As more advanced exercises/projects are coded mistakes in syntax and notation are easy to make and problem inquiries to the group might be the best approach.

Usually most learning curve difficulties are experienced in the same way by others. Collaborative practices suggests we leave notes at a Skill Checkpoint List, or perhaps our contact info if someone gets stuck or confused in the same way.

Collaborative Learning Factors per the Tanner article: See Footnote (1):

1. Positive Interdependence
2. Face-to-Face Promotive Action
3. Individual and Group Accountability
4. Interpersonal and Small-group skills
5. Group Processing

Of these five factors, #5 obviously requires some sort of group practices. This will be described here as this site is amended per our syllabus.

Collaborative Learning Requires Shared Plans
Everyone will customize their learning plan. See link, “Individual Learning Plan”

Seeking expert-like skills via collaborative learning:
1. Developmental Stages of Expertise,
2. Self-Assessment using BASA,
3. Making the best of transfer of skills

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *